Runoff in the Raccoon River

Did you know that raccoons wash their food when near a body of water? I love the image. I don't even know if raccoons live near the Raccoon River in Iowa anymore. But I do know where to find real-time nitrate and nitrite monitoring data for the Raccoon River.

Nitrate is NO3 and nitrite is NO2. They both occur naturally in soil and are also vitally important components of fertilizer. Fertilizer, of course, is necessary for the high-yield agriculture practiced in US states like Iowa. The difficulty is that nitrate and nitrite are highly water soluble. They're only useful to a plant if they're available to the plant at the right time in its growth cycle. If the soil is too dry for it to sink in and get to the roots of the plants or the plant doesn't grow due to bad weather, then excess fertilizer is left on the ground and runs off in the rain.

An interesting time to look at nitrate/nitrite runoff is as the snow is melting in the fields of Iowa. Fertilizer hasn't been applied for a season, so all that is left is the runoff from last year's application. It's often not raining yet, so the only water for runoff comes from snowmelt. Daily temperature fluctuations rule the amount of runoff each day for a few days.

So here's a graph-reading worksheet: it's not calculus, and is perhaps more focused on high-school or junior-high skills, but these are always worth a reminder....

Precalc: Nitrates in the Raccoon River

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